A RADICALLY CONDENSED HISTORY OF POSTINDUSTRIAL LIFE PDF

September 8, As a devoted reader of the late David Foster Wallace, when I first saw the trailer for the The End of the Tour, I was immediately filled with trepidation. Since Wallace committed suicide in , he has increasingly been lauded as a sad sage full of earnest bromides about self-awareness, compassion, and being present in the moment. In many ways, Wallace became more than one of the most important literary figures of the late 20th century after his death; he became a symbol of a certain sincerity and authenticity standing against the pervasive irony of modern popular culture. To portray Wallace as a sentimental sage, however, is to ignore so much of the tone of his work and thought. And, from the beginning, the production of The Tour has been rather controversial. The existence of a mythification of this brief passage of his life strikes me as an affront to him and to people who love his writing.

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September 8, As a devoted reader of the late David Foster Wallace, when I first saw the trailer for the The End of the Tour, I was immediately filled with trepidation. Since Wallace committed suicide in , he has increasingly been lauded as a sad sage full of earnest bromides about self-awareness, compassion, and being present in the moment. In many ways, Wallace became more than one of the most important literary figures of the late 20th century after his death; he became a symbol of a certain sincerity and authenticity standing against the pervasive irony of modern popular culture.

To portray Wallace as a sentimental sage, however, is to ignore so much of the tone of his work and thought.

And, from the beginning, the production of The Tour has been rather controversial. The existence of a mythification of this brief passage of his life strikes me as an affront to him and to people who love his writing.

For many fans of Wallace, including myself, this leads to the major concerns with the film: Would the film build on the sanitized DFW that has emerged since his suicide? And, how would Wallace — a deeply complex, even inscrutable person — and his ideas be portrayed, given that that The Tour is based off transcripts from a very discrete and unique moment in his life?

Now, who knows how happy or depressed or angst-ridden or ennui-consumed Wallace really was at the time of these conversations with Lipsky. DFW frequently lamented the solipsistic nature of experience. Ultimately, we can only experience the world in our own head; we are radically and fundamentally disconnected from each other in that specific way. As Pietsch points out, it would have mortified Wallace that his ideas and work were to be conveyed on the Big Screen through the medium of a Hollywood Star.

A note about the performances: The early clips I saw of Segel as Wallace horrified me. On this point, Kenny also agreed.

Wallace struggled with profound depression for much of his life. He hung himself in after weaning himself off an anti-depressant he had relied on for years and blamed for muddling his whirring brain and, he thought, styming his writing.

That darkness is completely absent from this performance. In any case, I think the performance does a disservice to someone like DFW, who was a complex, contemplative, wry and ultimately very sad person — at least for much of his life. The admixture of beautiful novelistic prose in its highest form, the ability to imitate technical medical, legal, pharmaceutical and all other sorts of technical jargon, with his flair for dialogue, slang, grotesquerie, and his own special host of neologisms just makes DFW such a pleasure to read.

In my estimation, there are few writers who are as fully capable of depicting the recursive aspects of anxiety and depression as Wallace. A literary establishment that had never so much as short-listed one of his books for a national prize now united to declare him a lost national treasure. He was the guy out there describing the world to all of us.

But, wading through the more difficult parts is well worth it. And a movie like The End of the Tour simply tries to eschew all the tough stuff and present us with a moral paragon, an American saint.

A Radically Condensed History of Postindustrial Life When they were introduced, he made a witticism, hoping to be liked. She laughed very hard, hoping to be liked. Then each drove home alone, staring straight ahead, with the very same twist to their faces. One never knew, after all, now did one now did one now did one.

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A Radically Condensed History of Postindustrial Life

In many ways, Wallace became more than one of the most important literary figures of the late 20th century after his death; he became a symbol of a certain sincerity and authenticity standing against the pervasive irony of modern popular culture. There is a moral tone to the work that belies its facility with the tricksiness of postmodernism. As Pietsch points out, it would have mortified Wallace that his ideas and histtory were to be conveyed on the Big Screen through the medium of a Hollywood Star. Post was not sent — check your email addresses! The existence of a mythification of this brief passage of his life strikes me as an affront to him and to people who love his writing.

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A Radically Condensed History of Postindustrial Life

Vudal There is a moral tone to the work that belies its facility with the tricksiness of postmodernism. One condenesd knew, after all, did one now did one now did one. He could, of course, be accused of merely colluding with the vapidities of a modern culture where everything is put into inverted commas. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Prev Posstindustrial Dolezal and the Racial Trickster: A note about the performances: Indeed, at one point he says: DFW frequently lamented the solipsistic nature of experience. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Now, who knows how happy or depressed or angst-ridden or ennui-consumed Wallace really postindustriaal at the time of these conversations with Lipsky. Since Wallace committed suicide inhe has increasingly been lauded as a sad sage full of earnest bromides about self-awareness, compassion, and being present in the moment.

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